Are you the next Gates?

This is a discussion on Are you the next Gates? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Originally Posted by MacGyver I have plans on finishing my deathray and taking over the world. I'd rather be the ...

  1. #31
    & the hat of GPL slaying Thantos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I have plans on finishing my deathray and taking over the world.
    I'd rather be the person controling the person controlling the deathray. That way if anything goes wrong you can cut them loose, place all blame on them, and find yourself a new puppet.

    Thantos for shadow government leader!

  2. #32
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by medievalelks View Post
    No, supply needs to be increased. There's enough in Alaska to supply the US for 200 years.

    But I'm down with nuclear as well. Wind, solar, nuclear, natty gas, oil - whatever it takes to get the US off of the foreign energy teat.
    BS. The entire reserve under the wildlife refuge will only provide a 6 month supply, ant it will take 50 years to extract. What is under the whoel state will take 200 years to deplete, but it will not provide our entire supply during that time. You need to do a bit more fact checking before making grandiose claims using fuzzy numbers.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

  3. #33
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    In oil shale alone, found in the Green River Formation in parts of Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming, the U.S. has approximately 800 billion barrels of recoverable oil, or over three times the proven reserves of Saudi Arabia
    sounds like a fairy tale to me...

    Quote Originally Posted by medievalelks View Post
    This report says that there may be enough in the Arctic alone for 12 years...
    the Arctic isn't USA. You were talking about US oil reserves.
    Still, drilling in the Arctic could be difficult because of the temperatures. And isn't there a treaty to keep the Arctic's ressources untouched, like with the Antarctic?
    I'm not sure about that, since the Arctic is just a bunch of frozen water, unlike the Antarctic.

    Quote Originally Posted by medievalelks View Post
    ...and that of course doesn't include the vast off shore area where we can't drill
    yes, where you can't drill... so its technically not a solution

    Long story short, I don't think that there are reserves or reserves that can be used to satisfy the oil demands.

    Even if there were, how does it help up? We'd just have more fuel to harm the environment with. If we don't put something on the other side of the equation, we'll destroy our own living space. (I wouldn't say we destroy earth, because it regenerates after we're gone)
    Some might say that this would at least lower the gas price, but I don't think so, because we don't have oil shortages at the moment, but we were still having peak prices a few weeks ago (1.60 EUR/l, which is about $9.44 per gallon).
    Judging from the individual's PoV, what does it help, if I can't pay the gas price?
    We shouldn't rely on a power source, which is controlled by a few companies and their lobby.

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    Your butt acts as a nozzle in the sense that the gas experiences a drop in pressure, from internal intestinal pressure to atmospheric pressure, and that pressure drop is subsequently converted into an increase in velocity (of the gas.) Theoretically, you could use this conversion of thermal-to-mechanical energy to impinge upon the blades of a turbine, thus spinning electrical conductors in a magnetic field to produce electricity.

    Note that the change in momentum of the gas is the net resulting thrust force experienced by the butt. This is the principal of operation of the first jet fighter, the German Messerschmitt Me 262.
    Last edited by BobMcGee123; 07-31-2008 at 06:12 PM.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

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    Registered User guesst's Avatar
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    I heard this recently in relation to the IT industry looking at becoming unionized. The union boss courting the IT field made the comment that a lot of folks in IT think they're going to be the next Bill Gates.

    The problem with IT and software in particular is it seems to me the top of a very precarious tower of resources. IT relies on manufacturing industry, electricity production, all of which are aspects of a fairly advanced society, and software often relies on software that others have written to write. Most people who write software have no concept and don't seem to care about the layers of resources they're balanced on, but to me it seems far too precarious a summit to build a kingdom on. Good for a quick buck, but to me it'd be a means to an end.
    Type-ins are back! Visit Cymon's Games at http://www.cymonsgames.com for a new game every week!

  6. #36
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Petroleum plays a much larger role in our economy than just energy. We can arguably supply our energy needs using nuclear, coal, etc. What we cannot supply however is the petrochemical industry, which requires the raw oil itself. There is no substitute for these.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mkruk View Post
    sounds like a fairy tale to me...
    That's a counter-argument?

    the Arctic isn't USA
    "Arctic" as in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), which is in Alaska.

    yes, where you can't drill... so its technically not a solution
    We can't drill because of politics, not because it's not possible.

    These are things we should have been doing decades ago, not when we're mired in a state of emergency. Democrats and Republicans have both failed the US on energy policy for far too long.
    Last edited by medievalelks; 08-04-2008 at 07:49 AM.

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    I understand the bit about wanting to expand drilling, I'm just afraid that extending drilling without any sort of a real alternative is going to put us into serious trouble in the future.

    I'd support drilling in ANWR if I believed we'd use the added oil to buy time to improve technology that can provide us with real alternatives. I'm just afraid we'd use it as a band aid and we'd just end up in the same position, just postpone it.

    Or something like that.

    Petroleum plays a much larger role in our economy than just energy. We can arguably supply our energy needs using nuclear, coal, etc. What we cannot supply however is the petrochemical industry, which requires the raw oil itself. There is no substitute for these.
    I'm interested what, exactly, you mean by this comment. Do you mean, for instance, the jobs associated with the petrol. industries? On a side note, I worked on a ship that supplies oil rigs in the Gulf. More notably we operated in the BP Atlantis oil field, which I believe is like the third largest in the Gulf. And I'm not gonna lie, those jobs pay well (a licensed ship's engineer grosses about $150,000 every 8 months for the company I was working with).
    http://www.bp.com/genericarticle.do?...tentId=7008067
    Last edited by BobMcGee123; 08-04-2008 at 08:04 PM.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

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