My first programming job

This is a discussion on My first programming job within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Originally Posted by DrSnuggles What kind of people was that... bums, slackers, lawyers? Nobody important I hope... Because we all ...

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrSnuggles View Post
    What kind of people was that... bums, slackers, lawyers? Nobody important I hope...
    Because we all know Nazi's were known for killing people that deserved it
    Here to Deceive, Inveigle, Obfuscate Since 1945

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    Yeah, I know, my wording is cumbersome. It was research done with cadavers donated for science. SO...if you donate yourself to science when you are dead your spine might get broken!

    It's also looking like I'm going to get to go into the field to take some measurements. We have accelerometers that are put in specific locations on the boat to gather acceleration data. The accelerometers work via strain gauges with little 'fibers' that flex when accelerated. The flex changes the electrical resistance of the fiber and subsequently alters the electrical signal applied across the fibers, which denotes the strain which denotes the acceleration. I got to watch how these devices are programmed and they're state machines that you might see with AI coding. We were having problems with one of the devices because it would keep sending packets of data as soon as it was turned on, which was interrupting data flow elsewhere.

    I've finally completed a stand-alone implementation of the spinal effective dosage and now I'm working to port it into the main simulation program. It's really cool to see how a real commercial physics simulation is coded. The front end is written with MFC. The application is multi-threaded and communicates with the physics simulation code stored in dlls across a common interface. The actual math is ridiculously complicated. The physics works by taking data from a vessel (keel and chine B-Spline curves) and generates hydrodynamic sections (wedges). The force on each section is calculated based on hydrostatic (submergence) and hydrodynamic (slamming) loads, taking vessel speed and wave action into account. It's cool stuff. I've also gotten to poke around in a commercial air cushion vehicle (hovercraft!) simulation written for Textron.

    So yeah like I said I got really really lucky.
    Last edited by BobMcGee123; 07-29-2008 at 03:36 PM.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

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    Hmm ok cadavers of what... humans? What kind of sick twisted thing is that to do... I don't think it is what they had in mind exactly when donating their bodies. Sound like something out of a horror movie. What's next.. human cadaver crash test dummies? I think you have unwillingly been snatched up by an evil corporation. Get out while you can before they start the brainwashing...they will be programming YOU!

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    Hmm... you are missing the point. A cadaver is an excellent choice for spine stress testing because you basically don't need to tell it to relax.

    You could use animals, but countries prohibit that. I think snakes would make great guinea pigs. Especially if you also had guinea pigs to feed them with. Moreover Nazis had it right. Cadavers is not always the best option when you want to test in the upright position and so they used living human beings. But Nazis were defeated.
    Last edited by Mario F.; 07-29-2008 at 03:55 PM.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    Hmm... you are missing the point. A cadaver is an excellent choice for spine stress testing because you basically don't need to tell it to relax.
    Hehe sure, and they can be used as legrests during lunchbreaks. The ones that are "used" folds up so nicely.

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    I really don't know if the people knew that their bodies would be dropped to determine the structural properties of the human spine, but the more common use of cadavers is to have them cut open poked and prodded by med students in their residency. A girl at the school I'm staying at just this week examined the facial tissue of a cadaver (after it was cut open by a med student). Regardless, donating your body for scientific testing involves some 'messiness' I guess.

    Moreover Nazis had it right. Cadavers is not always the best option when you want to test in the upright position and so they used living human beings. But Nazis were defeated.
    When I said 'people' I forgot the qualifier 'dead' people, and the research wasn't started until well after world war 2. I've read about weird Nazi experimentation (freezing people to determine how long a pilot or submariner could survive in the Atlantic) but I'm *pretty* certain that Nazi 'science' isn't included in this project. I hope.
    Last edited by BobMcGee123; 07-29-2008 at 04:04 PM.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

  7. #22
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Personally I always thought donating my body to science is a win-win situation. They get to learn something from me (... about bloody time!) and I get more attention per square inch of my body that I could ever have hoped in life.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Haha, fair point (I think).
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    Personally I always thought donating my body to science is a win-win situation. They get to learn something from me (... about bloody time!) and I get more attention per square inch of my body that I could ever have hoped in life.
    They WILL stick things up your butt...

    FOR SCIENCE!
    Here to Deceive, Inveigle, Obfuscate Since 1945

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    You guys are ........ing weird.

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    You're creative.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

  12. #27
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    Congratulations. I've done the intern thing too. You should have fun.

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