New to programming, were to start??

This is a discussion on New to programming, were to start?? within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Looking to get into programming, I have the Comp-Tia A+ certification, which is for hardware and software, so I do ...

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    Question New to programming, were to start??

    Looking to get into programming, I have the Comp-Tia A+ certification, which is for hardware and software, so I do know a little about computers as a whole, but I would like to learn code, write software for companies, or something along that guideline.

    What would be the best path to take, I was thinking to start with C, or do I need to go back even further to something else and work my way up to C or C++

    Thank you.
    Jeff

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    Sorry I asked...........

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    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsmith View Post
    Looking to get into programming, I have the Comp-Tia A+ certification, which is for hardware and software, so I do know a little about computers as a whole, but I would like to learn code, write software for companies, or something along that guideline.

    What would be the best path to take, I was thinking to start with C, or do I need to go back even further to something else and work my way up to C or C++

    Thank you.
    Jeff

    C or C++ are equally good langauges to learn. C is more embedded and for some can be slightly more complex to learn to begin with, but it is very powerful. C++ is an independant language from C although some of it's syntax is similar. It all depends what you really want to do. C++ can do everything C can with the addition of OOP ( Object Orientated Porgramming ) which involves creating objects using classes.

    Best bet is to find out what want to do as a goal, read up on both languages and remember you can always ask questions here for any guildlines.

    Good Luck
    I'm just trying to be a better person - My Name Is Earl

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    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    Well I do think you may of confused him with your reply.
    I'm just trying to be a better person - My Name Is Earl

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Don't be silly!

    Quote Originally Posted by (::) View Post
    web development interests you - forget c/c++
    For web, C#, PHP, ASP, Javascript, HTML, and the like may interest. C/C++ can do it, too, but they aren't naturally targeted at the web.

    embedded programming interests you - forget all else except c/assembly
    Nonsense. There are embedded that use C++ too. Asm/C/C++. You'll probably want to learn C, though.

    game development interests you - make sure you have more than a million dollar$
    For games, it's C++.

    And for normal Windows or other platform development, C++ is typically a good language.
    You don't need to learn C before C++.
    What to learn is up to you. Good luck.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  6. #6
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by (::) View Post
    again. expanded my general view too much. in some places they are arguing about lack of resources in embedded systems and here you seem to be favoring c++. the c++ on these systems you get is
    c++ - STL
    c++ - RTTI
    c++ - templates (not really sure).
    so all you finally get is a more type strict c. which is sometimes more pain to use than being helpful.
    No. That's good. Flexible code is what everyone wants.

    well i have seen 3D games running on cheap mobiles using java.
    And what could they have been if they weren't written in java? So much potential lost because of Java.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Jsmith, read swg and Elysia's reply. Forget the four dots guy, former "manav".

    Meanwhile, in my opinion, I'd suggest C++ as your starting language. There's a huge community of programmers, which these forums are just a tiny (and of high quality) portion, along with a mind-boggling number of resources on the web to learn from.

    This ensures you with a steady input of information during your learning process. If on top of that you buy a few good books on C++, you'll resize the learning curve to your benefit.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by (::) View Post
    who is it?
    You. If not, I don't care. Looks just like you. In fact, because your alias can't be used in a post without interfering with the current smilies code, I'll call you manav from now on.

    if i were a starter today. i would really appreciate that some one suggested me c++.
    There then. It's settled. Not that hard is it? Could be your one and only sentence on your first post.

    I'll just add to my previous post, however, that naturally other languages also enjoy from vibrant communities. I'm thinking of Java, for instance, which is a rather popular language too for newcomers. However, I still think C++ is a better choice for a couple other reasons:

    C++ has a strong Open Source environment associated with it. Not only access to code, but also access to free applications and tools intended to support C++ development. This is quite the catch if one wants to minimize costs of learning how to program. I can't measure it however, so if someone comes and says other languages have more... so they say.

    C++ will also allow you to gain an intimate knowledge of your computer. A knowledge that is essential if programming is something that you will want to pursue for the a good part of your life. Not only that but C++ also promotes and facilitates, after a while, the interest in other programming languages and systems. Again essential for any programmer.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Reverse Engineer maxorator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by (::) View Post
    i will add one more line to it. since java is mostly compile once and run anywhere type they do not have to give sources. but for c++ a source is a must to be able to compile for different platforms. which makes c++ more open.::
    Actually I think that cross-platform frameworks aren't really that popular...
    "The Internet treats censorship as damage and routes around it." - John Gilmore

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    Thank you all for your replies and sugestions, within the Cprogramming web site I did find a list of books to check out.


    Thanks
    Jeff

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    Super Moderator VirtualAce's Avatar
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    Several posts deleted. Performed some general housekeeping on the thread

    jsmith we wish you all the best in your desire to learn programming. Once again I do apologize for the thread getting so off-track.
    Last edited by VirtualAce; 05-17-2008 at 11:43 AM.

  12. #12
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Yes, good luck
    And if you choose, C/C++, or to some extent Java or C#, members of this board may help you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    If you've never programmed before, download Python to learn the basics of writing and running a program, variables, data structures, flow of control, functions, objects, etc. When you decide what kind of programming you'd like to do (Windows, UNIX, games, web, etc.) you can pick a language and/or framework that is more suitable.

    Realize that if you had asked this question in a Java forum, 99&#37; of the answers would have been for Java. Ditto C, Assembly, Ruby, Ocaml, etc.
    Last edited by medievalelks; 05-18-2008 at 06:42 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by maxorator View Post
    Actually I think that cross-platform frameworks aren't really that popular...
    Cross platform frameworks are very popular, cross-platform applications may or may not be.

  15. #15
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    The concept is popular on both accounts.

    There is an ever growing genuine interest in supplying applications that run on as many systems as possible - both commercial and open source or freeware. What is becoming pass&#233;e is exactly the opposite.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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