Book spree

This is a discussion on Book spree within the A Brief History of Cprogramming.com forums, part of the Community Boards category; Hallo, I was thinking of buying some new books now and was wondering if someone could recommend something. I feel ...

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    Book spree

    Hallo,

    I was thinking of buying some new books now and was wondering if someone could recommend something. I feel that I am starting to understand c++ OK, but I am no expert. I would like some books that focused on how to write good code, not just code.

    So here is my shopping list:
    * One book to have as a c++ syntax reference (Maybe "The C++ Programming Language" by Bjarne Stroustrup )
    * The Art of Computer Programming (1-3) by Knuth
    * A introduction to assembly. Any recommendations?
    * A book about basic AI. Any recommendations?

    Any other book anyone here strongly recommend? Im am ordering them from Amazon in US to Norway, so it is better to order several books at the same time.

    Thanks

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    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    Good code comes from good design IMO. The technique you use to build a barbecue in the back garden won't work when it comes to building the house.
    http://www.amazon.com/UML-Distilled-...8621088&sr=8-1

    Another shorter book list.
    http://www.rafb.net/efnet_cpp/books/

    Knuth is great if you want to know all about algorithms, but since the STL hides away a lot of that, do you really need to know it on a daily basis?
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    I'd suggest, all from Addison Wesley,

    Romanik & Muntz' Applied C++
    Sutter & Alexandrescu's C++ Coding Standards
    Scott Meyers' Effective C++ series

    Not sure what to advise concerning AI. The only book I had was a borrowed one which I can't remember the title exactly, but it was from Premier Press. Wasn't entirely happy with it though.

    As for design, other than Applied C++ which also brushes on this issue. I really like Applying UML and Patterns from Addison Wesley.

    As for assembly no idea; This topic only marginally interests me.
    Last edited by Mario F.; 04-19-2008 at 01:54 PM.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    I would like some books that focused on how to write good code, not just code.
    There is Write Great Code by Randall Hyde, which does dwell on assembly language.
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    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    Code Complete, which is published by Microsoft. It is quite good.
    My Website

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidP View Post
    Code Complete, which is published by Microsoft. It is quite good.
    Ah yes, and oldie but a goodie. One of the first I read. I also liked "Writing Solid Code" by Maquire, but always got a kick out of the subtitle:

    "Microsoft's Techniques for Developing Bug-Free C Programs"

    Kind of like

    "Id Software's Techniques for Developing Family Friendly Games"
    Last edited by medievalelks; 04-20-2008 at 09:16 AM.

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    Thanks a lot for the recommendations. Any assembly books I should look at?

    Microsoft's Techniques for Developing Bug-Free C Programs"

    Kind of like

    "Id Software's Techniques for Developing Family Friendly Games"
    Awesome!

    Knuth is great if you want to know all about algorithms, but since the STL hides away a lot of that, do you really need to know it on a daily basis?
    your right. Might try to find a good book on STL instead. I want a book on algorithms as well, as I have to do a "algorithms and data structures class" next year.

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    how many books can you go through?

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    I was not planning to read them all now. But it is cheaper to order several at the same time for me, so I try to order several good books on topics that interests me

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    Captain Crash brewbuck's Avatar
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    I don't really have a comment on the other categories, but I want to say "Good on you" for choosing Knuth. That book is fairly intense.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    hmm... yes. Maybe too intense, actually.

    Knuth is next to impossible to read if one doesn't have a strong background in computer science , or working for it. If that's not the case, I'd suggest staying away from this book as it may quickly become an exercise in frustration and move you from your current objective; Learning C++
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Two more:

    Programming Pearls, by Bentley.

    Conceptual Blockbusting, by Adams.
    Last edited by medievalelks; 04-23-2008 at 08:23 PM.

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